Summertime memories of Pine Island and how my mother – and a boat – saved our family when we needed it the most

By ROBERT ST. JOHN,

Memories come in all shapes, sizes, sounds, smells, and sights. Occasionally a song strikes a note that trips a memory, other times we’ll see something that reminds us of another thing, that reminds us of still another thing.

Sometimes all of those components come together at once to bring back a vivid recollection.






MAM-MAW: She was selfless, pure, and good-hearted – a perfect example of a gracious southern lady

By ROBERT ST. JOHN,

Note: Portions of the following column are included in a foreword I wrote for the upcoming book, “Life Lessons for Our Grandchildren,” by Marilyn Tinnin. You’ll be able to find the book in all of usual places this fall.

My paternal grandmother, Eunice Holleman St. John, was the greatest influence in, and on, my life.





Breakfast with dad

By ROBERT ST. JOHN,

Every parent has a go-to breakfast. In our house, my wife typically makes the before-school morning meal. Most days, I was already at work while the kids were preparing for school. I fill in on occasion with “daddy breakfasts.”

Daddy breakfasts are usually reserved for special occasions or out-of-town sojourns with the guys.



Column: Jolly senses

By ROBERT ST. JOHN,

My senses are strongly connected to my memory. Something as small as a single thought can trigger a vivid recollection.

But nothing brings back a memory more intensely than four of our five senses— sound, smell, sight, and taste. Sorry, touch, you’re out of this conversation.



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